797.14 Nic (c2001)*

A Voyage for MadmenSarah P’s comments: This book is a gripping account of the 1968 first ever Golden Globe Race in which nine sailors set off to single-handedly circumnavigate the globe nonstop. It had never been done and ten months later, only one of the nine men would cross the finish line and earn fame, wealth, and glory. For the others, the reward was madness, failure, and death.

How’s that for a plotline? A fascinating read even for those not interested in sailing books. This story has risen to the top of my list of blog posts because just this year they released a movie about one of the sailors in it.

British businessman, Donald Crowhurst entered the race with little funding and even less sailing knowledge. His start was difficult and things went downhill from there. The movie is aptly (in my opinion) named The Mercy and stars Colin Firth, which fact alone is enough to make me want to view it.

However, I would encourage you to read the book because A Voyage for Madmen tells the story of all the racers, the two which I found most fascinating being; Robin Knox-Johnston and the infamous Bernard Moitessier. In fact, it was reading the details of Moitessier’s race, that led me to deciding I had to read his books…

In the next few blog posts, I will share the books that these sailors have written.

Quotes:

They can’t answer the question why. They can’t make people who couldn’t do what they do – understand.

*I completely disagree with this cataloguing choice. This is adventure of the tallest order which is 910.4 not 797.14 (boating)!WaterBug letters

 

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JF AIK (c1966)

Nightbirds on NantucketSarah P’s comments:  Once in while I am going to deviate and include a children’s book. For years I was a children’s librarian so it’s bound to happen…

This year we sailed to Nantucket and I biked to Sankaty Head. This lighthouse has been on my bucket list ever since I first read Nightbirds on Nantucket many years ago. Written by Joan Aiken (Conrad Aiken’s daughter), the first third of the book takes place on a whaling ship from Nantucket. It’s fun, it’s authentic, and it makes a great read-aloud if you’re trying to get small fry interested in sailing and ships…

Quotes:

‘Oh, fierce is the ocean and wild is the sound,
But the isle of Nantucket is where I am bound-
Sweet isle of Nantucket! where the grapes are so red,
And the light flashes nightly on Sankaty Head!’

 

Sankaty Head

Me @ Sankaty Head, Nantucket, summer 2018

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910.4 Man (c1966)

Sarah P’s comments:  I’m back from sailing our boat home from North Carolina to Maine…glorious but hot!  Along the way, I re-read Tinkerbelle, one of the best small boat voyaging books out there. It’s hard to say why this story is so good but a large part is due to Manry’s straight-forward but light-hearted writing style

TinkerbelleWhen I researched what became of Manry I discovered that the book was so successful that he was able to buy a bigger boat and go cruising for a year with his wife and kids. Wow, great! But the year after they returned his wife died in a car crash and two years later Manry died from a massive heart attack. Those sobering facts lend weight to his ‘do what you can with what you have’ message.

If you enjoy the book and wish to know more, I am happy to report that there is a filmmaker who has created ‘The Robert Manry Project‘ with a goal of promoting Manry’s book and film footage.

Here is a YouTube video link of Manry’s arrival in Cornwall and also a Wikipedia article about him.

Manry at Sea

Quotes:

The dream of ocean voyaging remained in the back of my mind like an incubating microbe waiting for the right moment to flare up as a full-blown disease. Every so often, after reading some particularly gripping tale, I became afflicted with a virulent sea fever.

I had an inexplicable notion that a voyage was a kind of microcosm of life, a life within a life…It seemed to me, too, that in this abbreviated life a sailor had an opportunity to compensate for the blemishes, failures, and disasters of his life ashore.

Sailing…helps to keep a man aware of his lowly place in the universe, especially if [it] involves celestial navigation. For there is nothing to equal the astringent effect on one’s ego of a long, thoughtful look into outer space.

Sailors have seldom been envied by confirmed landlubbers.

 

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