910.4 Man (c1966)

Sarah P’s comments:  I’m back from sailing our boat home from North Carolina to Maine…glorious but hot!  Along the way, I re-read Tinkerbelle, one of the best small boat voyaging books out there. It’s hard to say why this story is so good but a large part is due to Manry’s straight-forward but light-hearted writing style

TinkerbelleWhen I researched what became of Manry I discovered that the book was so successful that he was able to buy a bigger boat and go cruising for a year with his wife and kids. Wow, great! But the year after they returned his wife died in a car crash and two years later Manry died from a massive heart attack. Those sobering facts lend weight to his ‘do what you can with what you have’ message.

If you enjoy the book and wish to know more, I am happy to report that there is a filmmaker who has created ‘The Robert Manry Project‘ with a goal of promoting Manry’s book and film footage.

Here is a YouTube video link of Manry’s arrival in Cornwall and also a Wikipedia article about him.

Manry at Sea

Quotes:

The dream of ocean voyaging remained in the back of my mind like an incubating microbe waiting for the right moment to flare up as a full-blown disease. Every so often, after reading some particularly gripping tale, I became afflicted with a virulent sea fever.

I had an inexplicable notion that a voyage was a kind of microcosm of life, a life within a life…It seemed to me, too, that in this abbreviated life a sailor had an opportunity to compensate for the blemishes, failures, and disasters of his life ashore.

Sailing…helps to keep a man aware of his lowly place in the universe, especially if [it] involves celestial navigation. For there is nothing to equal the astringent effect on one’s ego of a long, thoughtful look into outer space.

Sailors have seldom been envied by confirmed landlubbers.

 

WaterBug letters

 

 

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